Category Technique

Blanket-Stitched Fused Applique

Fused Applique

Fused, blanket stitched pieces of fabric, to be sewn on a quilt top are called a blanket-stitched fused applique patches. Fusing is a quick and easy method of appliqueing patches, with machine stitching adding color and texture.

When a patch is to be overlapped by another patch, the underneath patch needs to have extra material added to the edges that will be covered by the top patch. Mark a dashed line on the pattern to indicate these places. Trace each patch onto the paper side of the fusible web, adding the extensions if needed and leaving 1/2″ between patches. Cut the traced patches apart, adding about 1/4″ around the drawn lines. Following the manufacture’s directions, press the fusible web to the wrong side of the fabric. Cut out  each patch on the marked line...

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Fused Versus Traditional Applique

Fused Versus Traditional Applique

Some pattern instructions suggest that you “prepare  patches for your chosen applique”.  What if you haven’t done much applique, how do you know if you should use the fused versus traditional applique method for any given project? There are several things to consider when deciding the method to  use.

There are three methods of applique that are used in most appliqued quilt patterns. The first is called “heirloom or traditional” applique, in which each patch has a turned edge and is finished with a hand blind stitch. This is the most time consuming method. For many quiltmakers, this technique provides a very nice way to have a carry-along project. For a quilt that will become a family treasure, traditional is well worth the time...

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Crazy Quilts

crazy quilt

There are no 2 crazy quilts alike. There is no set rules or patterns for a crazy quilt. Crazy quilts are pieced blocks stitched fabric piece by fabric piece onto a stable fabric such as 100% cotton muslin. Here are two methods for piecing these blocks.

First, determine the size of your crazy block. Usually a 6″ or 8″ is a good size to begin with. From the muslin cutout the size of the finished block plus 1/2″ which allows for a 1/4″ seam allowance around all four sides. This is the foundation piece.

Start with any shape desired (triangle, square pentagon, etc.) and pin it to the foundation, right side up.  Cut a strip of fabric (width is variable) and place right side down along one straight edge of the shape...

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Quick Hourglass Units

 Quick Hourglass Units

Try this quick and easy way to make quick hourglass units without cutting triangles. First have light and dark materials. from each of the light and dark fabrics ; cut a squre one and one quarter inches larger than the desired size of the hourglass unit. For example, to make an hourglass unit that will finish at a three inch dimension cut four and one quarter inch squares.

Next on the wrong side of the light square draw a line diagonally from corner to corner across the square. Mark stitching lines at one quarter inch away on either side of this diagonal line. Now place the light square over the top of the dark square with the right side of the fabric facing each other, Stitch along each of the lines that are one quarter inch away from diagonal line.

Cut ...

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Log Cabin Block

Items needed for log cabin block

Tips for Beginners: 

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Let’s take a minute to go over a few tips for beginners. You can certainly use a ruler, fabric marking pen, and scissors to cut your pieces. But quilters know that a clear quilter’s ruler and a rotary cutter used with a cutting mat will give you accurate results more quickly. To use a quilter’s ruler, match up the measurement line with the edge of the fabric. For this quilt block, I need strips that are two inches wide. So count over two inches, then line that mark up with the edge of your fabric. Stabilize the ruler with one hand and place the rotary cutter blade right next to the ruler’s edge...

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